17 September 2009

naked ladies

watercolor on velke losiny moldau CP 300gsm, 20"x30".

i bought these flowers at bill's market and set them in a vase for two days. i drew a foundation in watercolor pencil, then in charcoal or carbon pencil over that. finally the drawing was washed or filled in with watercolor paint. i didn't like the way the background turned out, so i trimmed the sheet at both ends, and i finished the pot quickly because i was bored with the work.

the point was the freehand drawing, a more complicated drawing than i've done in a long time without a grid or projected image. i am becoming more aware of how a drawing emerges out of first marks so that i can make those marks with the right focus.

i like the way the blossoms cover the stems, and the variety of curls and perspectives in the six pointed star at the end of each blossom cone. they are called "naked ladies" because the blossoms stalk out of the bare ground. the leaves emerge and die off in the summer.

5 comments:

Catherine said...

Very nice work. I like the way you combined watercolor with watercolor pencil and charcoal.
Congratulations for all your works and your fantastic knowledge of art materials.

Kathy said...

Beautiful rendering of these delicate flowers. Your use of line is masterful!

Anonymous said...

Your blog keeps getting better and better! Your older articles are not as good as newer ones you have a lot more creativity and originality now keep it up!

Anonymous said...

I really like this flower painting, but I have to say, it's strikingly similar to the Van Gogh flower painting you put down. The way you flattened and outlined the petals looks very Japanese (like Van Gogh!). I think most people haven't read Van Gogh's letters and just like the look of his paintings. Van Gogh's flat, saturated colors are just as appealing to me as Caravaggio's chiaroscuro.

Bruce said...

actually, i dislike this painting, so i'm not bothered by the comparison with van gogh. but i am surprised you make it because, as bad art goes, this painting and van gogh's flowers are in completely different directions. for example, the paint in the van gogh resembles some kind of skin disease; and shows very little of the japanese influence. the background in my painting looks like some kind of hangover.

but i did enjoy the drawing of it, and if you read van gogh's letters as closely as i have, you'll be surprised at how rarely anything like enjoyment appears in them, with regard to painting or anything else. lust for life, indeed.